The 1960s wasn’t about Woodstock, it was about Mom

Patch - Another Mother for Peace

The basis of my argument is that the dramatic cultural manifestations of the 1960’s, whether they took the form of music festivals in which new thinking is proposed or anti-war demonstrations or racial unity marches on Washington, were just that — manifestations of systemic dissatisfaction that sat at the very root of human life. For the first time in history, women started to flex their muscles in a goal as old as Lysistrata, if not in technique.

It is as simple as this — in postwar WWII America, there came a time, previously unknown, when mothers were able to rear their children in true peace and progress. The horrors of WWII were indelibly impressed on the personal experiences of hundreds of millions of the world’s population. Peace and plenty was welcome.

The pastoral days were short-lived. Cultural eruptions were presenting themselves. “Beware MIC” said a President who should know. People were demonstrating everywhere. At lunch-counters in the South because all men are created equal. When an assassin’s bullet burst the brain of a beloved President, America’s profile really began to tear. And then there was Vietnam. That was when Mom showed up.

By 1967, when 11,153 American servicemen were killed, Mom had enough. One such, my grandmother, joined with millions of others in organizing Another Mother for Peace. They made no bones about how their reality differed from those who were running the government. They declared:

I JOIN WITH MY SISTERS IN EVERY LAND IN THE PAX MATERNA – A PERMANENT DECLARATION OF PEACE THAT TRANSCENDS OUR IDEOLOGICAL DIFFERENCES. IN THE NUCLEAR SHADOW, WAR IS OBSOLETE. I WILL NO LONGER SUFFER IT IN SILENCE NOR SUSTAIN IT BY COMPLICITY. THEY SHALL NOT SEND MY SON TO FIGHT ANOTHER MOTHER’S SON. FOR NOW, FOREVER, THERE IS NO MOTHER WHO IS ENEMY TO ANOTHER MOTHER.

From <http://anothermother.org/>

They didn’t just help defeat President Lyndon Johnson, at one time among the most powerful and influential men in the United States Senate, they broke him. Although the casualty figures grew in 1968, they began to drop in 1969, which was a year in which people demonstrated not just a willingness to abandon the Establishment, but a compulsion to stray from conformity … at the core of the liberation of the human spirit was the realization the women did not bear children to see them savaged by war.

There was more. Women saw in the eyes of a child of another color the mother of the child. People who look at skin color as some sort of differentiator just don’t get the nature of living. The eyes have it. There we can see each other, and those who have been reared to live the Golden Rule can live with those who have been reared to observe the principle of ‘namaste’ and each can learn from and live among one another without conflict. It takes work but “Oh so rewarding!”  

Examine the historical canvas upon which wars unfolded, wars which ripped families apart and destroyed lives, you’ll often find hydrocarbon reserves playing a prominent role in the picture. For all of history, energy has been a scarce resource. Now, because of discoveries that commenced in what has to be acknowledged to be a ‘marvelous enabling decade,’ the period between 1830 and 1840, not only is energy available, but we are blessed with an unlimited supply until the sun stops shining.

We live in a time when history is rapidly unfolding. It may very well be that a historian of a future time will point to these days and recognize that the people of the world are now a point of global inflection, and no amount of resistance will change the realization that we all have a mother, and she rules. Period.

If I were you, I’d stay tuned. Come January 1, 2020, the Solar Hydrocarbon Era is here.       

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